Colour coordination in Danish lights

Posted by modblog 12/11/2010 0 Comment(s) Fog & Mørup,Louis Poulsen,Verner Panton,Jo Hammerborg,Peter Avondoglio,

In the late 1960s both Louis Poulsen and Fog & Mørup launched lines of assorted lamp models in coordinated colours under unifying taglines. In 1968 and 1969 Louis Poulsen’s Young Line embraced the company’s Combipendel, Søvaernspendel, Emaillearmatur, Billiardpendel and the Verner Panton-designed Topan and Flower Pots, and was offered in orange, red, turquoise, blue and (for some of the models) white. 

Louis Poulsen Young Line

Louis Poulsen Young Line

Fog & Morup, meanwhile, launched its Rainbow Line (pictured below) in 1969, bringing together the Falcon, Juno, Zone and Equator in red, yellow, blue and white versions. This was closely followed by the White Line, a counterpoint to the vibrant colours of the Rainbow Line and marketed as “attractive, simple lights [that] can be used in almost any interior, irrespective of colour key or materials”. 

Fog Mørup Rainbow Line

The White Line (below) featured the Viking and Junior floor lamps, the Alfa and Corda wall lamps and the Lento table lamp, all of which had been produced previously in other colours or finishes, along with the multi-haloed Hydra, a new light in two versions which would only ever be produced in white.

Fog Mørup White Line

Fog Mørup White Line

The idea of cross-model colour coordination was in fact deeply embedded in Fog & Morup's culture, with many lamp models in the early 1960s being produced in three separate metal finishes – aluminium, brass and copper – allowing the customer to choose different models for different areas of the home and still achieve a harmonious look throughout (see, for example, the Lento and Orient table lamps and the Nova pendant light, pictured in the following three images).

Fog Mørup brass copper aluminium finishes

Fog Mørup brass copper aluminium finishes

Fog Mørup brass copper aluminium finishes

Indeed, colour coordination across models was a permanent feature of the F&M landscape during Jo Hammerborg’s reign as director of design through the 1960s and 1970s, the unifying colours changing over time as tastes and fashions altered. The mid to late 1970s, for example, saw F&M models including the Arabia range, Hans Due's Pfister (first image below), Peter Avondoglio's Contact (second image below) and Hammerborg's own Poker, Bunker, Flora, Markise and Aktiv being offered in various combinations of that period’s key colours of yellow, orange, red, brown, green and white.

Fog Mørup 1970s colour coordination

Fog Mørup 1970s colour coordination

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